Resources‎ > ‎

Cayuga Lake Basin First Records and Arrival Information

First Records: For many years, the Cayuga Bird Club kept a handwritten "First Records" list, which detailed the first record of each species reported in the Cayuga Lake Basin each year. These lists, sometimes beautifully illustrated by local artists, were prominently displayed at the Laboratory of Ornithology and are now archived at Cornell's Kroch Library. After a few years without a First Records list, Matthew Medler restarted the tradition and constructed and maintained the list from 1998 through 2009. Dave Nutter has been the primary caretaker of the list since 2010.

2017

NB: see here if the document below is not visible or accessible.

Cayuga Basin First Records 2017


2016

NB: see here if the document below is not visible or accessible.

Cayuga Basin First Records 2016

2015

NB: see here if the document below is not visible or accessible.

Cayuga Basin First Records 2015


2014

NB: see here if the document below is not visible or accessible.

Cayuga Basin First Records 2014


2013


NB: see here if the document below is not visible or accessible.

Cayuga Basin First Records 2013



2012

NB: see here if the document below is not visible or accessible.

Cayuga Basin First Records 2012



1998-2011

NB: See here if the document below is not visible or accessible.

Basin First Records


Spring Arrival Dates

Matthew Medler has prepared a list of spring arrival dates for nearly 130 species seen as spring migrants in the Cayuga Lake Basin between 2000 and 2009. This list can be compared with a list of average spring arrival dates prepared by Dr. Charles R. Smith, based on data from 1903 to 1993. 

NB: See here if the document below is not visible or accessible.

Cayuga Lake Basin Spring Arrival Dates



Shorebird Migration: Steve Kelling analyzed migrant shorebird data dating back to 1909 to construct a bar chart showing the status of these birds in the Cayuga Lake Basin. This is an incredible resource for learning when and in what numbers different shorebird species pass through the area.